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Christmas, crafts, Holidays

Chinese Christmas Cards (Free Printable)

Here is a fun craft you can do with your kids to get them excited about Christmas. Often, when Chinese people wish each other a happy holiday, they insert a wish for that person. For example, “新年快樂,年年有餘 / Happy New Year, may you have abundance year after year!” I made a card that embodies that idea of leaving a wish for someone, because what speaks more to Christmas than looking outside yourself and thinking of others.

Here is the PDF file to the free printable of this pop-up present Chinese Christmas card. Before you print this out, make sure to read the instructions below.

Instructions:

  • First, print out the printable on 2 separate sheets. That is because you will glue them back to back at the very end.
  • Color and customize. I made the Chinese characters faded out so children can trace them.
  • Cut along the heavy dotted lines. You may have to fold the top and bottom of the present box so it can pop out properly.
  • Insert your wish for that person into the present. I left one blank because who knows what creative wish your kid will come up with.
  • Glue the papers back to back.
  • Give to someone you love, or use it as a display.

In all the displacement and adjustment that has gone on this year, I grateful for the simple traditions that come with the holidays that help retain some of the rhythms of life. Wish you and yours a merry Christmas!

crafts, Culture, Holidays

The Story Behind Chinese Valentine’s Day

This year, Chinese Valentine’s Day or 七夕/Qīxī falls on August 25th, 2020. This is the one day in the entire year that the two lovers (the Cowherd and the Weaver Girl) are reunited. It is romantic and tragic and a good reminder to cherish those we love. It is also a fun explanation to why the stars Vega and Altair seem to stare at each other from across the Milky Way.

I created a printable you can use at home to share this story with your child. It is not only a coloring page, but a folding page–one that hides and reveals parts of the image to tell the story.

My daughter loved to fold the page over and over to retell the story. She was a little concerned about how sad the story was and felt it was unfair. She tried to think of various hypothetical situations where the two lovers and their children could be together all the time. We had a talk about it, and it was a good way to connect. After you tell the story, consider discussing the following questions with your child:

  • Why do you think the Queen Mother of Heaven disapproved of the marriage?
  • Why did the magpies want to help? What can you do to help someone when they are sad?
  • If you could only visit your family one day in the year, what activities would you choose to do?

You can download the printable below in English, Traditional, or Simplified Chinese.

I hope you have fun exploring the story behind this Chinese holiday!

Products

New Book Release: Turkey Rides a Rocket

The inspiration for this book came from one of my favorite Dr. Seuss books, “Hop on Pop.” I loved how he introduced just two words and used these words to create a simple sentence–all while telling a funny story. It is more challenging than it looks. I decided to take this idea–this challenge–to create story that utilized the unique nuances of the Chinese language. I like how Chinese words are made up of components that describe the word quite literally. For example, “balloon” in Chinese is “air-ball.” “Train” in Chinese is “fire-car.” So I made a book centered around the word, “fire” and all the words that stem from it.

Hence, “Turkey Rides a Rocket” was born, and I’m excited to share it with you and your family. It follows a turkey on a dangerous adventure, one that will have you laughing.

Here are previews of some of the inside pages. You can see the book uses a big font and colorful illustrations to engage young readers. Each story also is supplemented with parent tips and a game at the end to encourage further application of the vocabulary you have just learned.

There are two other stories included in this book as well. The second story, “Where is Little Brother?” is a finding or I-spy story, where you can encourage your child to find an item in a detailed 2-spread picture. This has been very effective in teaching my daughter how to say, “Where is_____” in Chinese, even if she does not know how to say the item in Chinese, it has made that phrase useful to her.

The last story is called, “Mama’s Tea.” This one is a rhyming story, and works to reenforce reading and pronunciation. The mom in this story goes crazy after she finds that the dad has been drinking her tea. Perhaps it is how I wish I could act if I could let my emotions fly loose.

All in all, it is 66 pages of easy, useful Chinese. If you are not a Chinese speaker, you can listen to the online audio for this book and never miss a beat. Below is a video where I read the book, cover to cover.

I hope this book gets you excited to use more Chinese in the home! Let me know your thoughts and if you get the chance to review it on Amazon, that would help me to be able to produce more books for you.

Happy Learning!

Available in paperback on Amazon!

Culture, Holidays

The Story of QuYuan – The History Behind the Dragon Boat Festival

I’m happy to present a shadow puppet video that tells the story behind the Dragon Boat Festival in a fun way that kids will like! The benefit of listening to short bilingual videos are many-fold. If your kids are just beginners, it is a good way to expose them to how the language sounds. If they are more advanced, they can start to pick out words or phrases that was mirrored in their first language. If they are fluent, they can practice retelling the story in both languages. I hope whatever your level, you and your family can enjoy this simple explanation to a beloved Chinese holiday.

If you would like more ways to celebrate the Dragon Boat Festival, Tiny Chinese Homeschool has released fun videos and activities for the whole month of June that you can explore.

Here is a recap of what we have done:

Happy Learning!

crafts, Culture, Holidays

Shadow Puppet Tutorial

As part of the Tiny Chinese Homeschool Dragon Boat Festival Virtual Celebration, we are sharing a free activity you can do at home with your kids. Shadow puppets were a traditional way to tell stories in ancient China. My first exposure to it was watching “To Live” by Zhang Yimou. It seemed like something that looked simple but took a lot of skill. Here is an example you can see from the movie (you’ll need to skip to 25:18 and just watch 1 minute of it):

I wanted my kids to try it out, so I made a simplified version of it so they could control the little puppet with just two hands and chopsticks. And guess what? They loved it! My daughter found it fascinating to manipulate the hands and body. She made up her own stories or reenacted Chinese stories I had told her. I hope you can try it out too!

You will need:

  • cardstock paper
  • brads
  • tape
  • scissors
  • chopsticks
  • parchment paper

Instructions:

  1. Print out the free printable below. Cut out the man and body parts.
  1. Use brads to connect the hands to the arms and the arms to the body. Make sure to refer to the colored circles to know which part connects to which part. Use a brad to connect the legs to the body. You need to make this brad loose so the legs can swing freely as the body wiggles.
  1. Take the square cut out and curl up the white part so it makes a cylinder just big enough to fit a chopstick or pencil. Tape it closed. Then use the colored tab at the end of the square as a flat point to connect it to the puppet with tape. Again, make sure to match the colored rectangles to affix it.
  1. Now you can take a pair of chopsticks and stick them in the cylinders. You may need to pinch down the opening of the cylinder so it fits more snug around the chopstick. You can now move your puppet!
  1. Use parchment paper make a screen where the puppets can show flat against. I used two benches and placed them on top of one another to make a stage. Tape the sides of the parchment paper firmly so it will not move when the puppets press against it. As long as you have a light or a bright window behind your stage, you are ready to go!

I hope you will have a lot of fun with your puppet! And once you get the basic idea, you can experiment with your own designs or even cut our eyes in the faces!

My kids and I used these shadow puppets to create a video that tells the story behind the Dragon Boat Festival. I hope you check back next week to see it–it will be a real treat!